Norway Bike Hike (Part 1): Geiranger and Norddal

The goal was neither to go highest, deepest, fastest, furthest or toughest – I would bike, hike and rest whenever and wherever I wanted – no stress – just be!  Finally the time had come for my very own “10-day-moment” and my trek bike was packed and ready to roll on a roadtrip. The Norwegian highway was waiting with its amazing mountains, fjords and solid people – once again I would curiously explore my own country.

Selfie: My very last mountain trek in Trafjordfjella before hitting the road, where I discovered this beautiful panoramic pearl that very day. Well, what a view to be leaving, but new one’s where waitingnorwegian mountain tafjordfjella fjelltur natur panorama liss myrås 

The bike trip plan had been yeasting somewhere in the back of my head all summer when I worked at the  power and avalance center in Tafjord, but it was not before I got my hands on a very cheap but solid Polish trek bike that I knew I would be biking home to visit my momma before heading back to Sweden where I live now.

A panoramic break at Eidsvatnet (Norddal) to enjoy this awesome mountain ridge named Skorene – it’s hhest point is Søre Skora wich is 1829 meters a.s.l Norway Skorene Norddal mountain ridge foto Liss Myrås

 

I collected the most essential bicycle equipment a little bit from here and there, something new, old and borrowed, and briefly planned possible bicycle routes and tent camps online … the rest would probably solve itself gradually on-the-road. I would say: Plan your trip to death = stress and disappointments! But one thing is important to plan when you bike in Norway – know where your tunnels are! (see link below)

So, what could be seen, done or enjoyd these 10 days I had for my very own disposal before going back to daily routines, duties and tasks piling in the horizon? Nature, nature and nature… and awesome wonderful people!! ♥

Looking back to Geiranger somewhere between those mountains – you will never get tired of the view!Norway bicycle ride Geiranger road landscape photo liss myrås

I did’t have a clue that my total bike luggage weighed well over 25 kilos! I had two filled waterproof sidebags, a handlebar bag and my tent roped on the handlebars, a waterproof stuff sack containing my sleeping bag on the luggage carrier, and finally a backpack containing my laptop and camera etc Not to forget new led lights, reflections in many forms… and of course my nice cool reflex pennant! 😉 It’s so goddamn important to be seen on the roads and in tunnels!

First aimed stopover was the famous Geiranger, so that day in August I finally rolled on my bike down the first hill away from my hired summer residence – a bit worried that the bike would violently puncture or collapse after a few meters, but it worked like a charm – all the way actually!

First through the scary Heggurdtunnelen for the very last time that summer …. passing Valldal and then taking the ferry across the fjord to Eidsdal and started the mild ascent up to Eagle Road (Ørnevegen).

From Ørnevegen everything went downwards the awesome serpentine roads only interrupted by a short obligatory photo shoot break at the famous Ørnesvingen. The nice thing about biking is that you also can stop on tricky places where cars can’t to get a great shot!

Shot on my way down Eagle Road (Ørnevegen) towards GeirangerNorway Geiranger Ørnevegen bike trip photo liss myrås

 

I did not feel for stopping when I passed the little town in Geiranger because it was just packed with lots of tourists, noicy aggressive buses and cars – this is not how I remember Geiranger from my younger days. I talked to a local that was pretty tired of this circus, tourists come into thei’r private garden and stare at them through the windows while they are having breakfast…  ha..ha ..so visitors, please behave! 😀

Geiranger tent camping bike tour sunset photo liss myrås

 

So, I continued up the narrow and steeper sperpentine road that eventually would lead me to Djupvasshytta the day after. Halfway ascending I decided to spend the night at a cosy and peaceful camping. After a beautifulsunsetit rained all night, but my very cheap and light tent actually did not leak! Greatful for that indeed I am! The sun finally showed up at noon next day so I could dry my tent in the wind at no-time and continue up the panoramic road ascent up to Djupvasshytta where gale wind was waiting.

Welcomed by gale wind and rain when I finally reached the plateau close to Djupvasshytta (where I enjoyed a massive waffle-dinner.) From now the roads would slightly incline downwards – very nice after two ascents.  

Oppe på fjellet mot Djupvasshytta

 

The tunnel map for bikers below was indeed very helpful – in this way I could see when, where and how to prepare for every tunnel and readabout other bikers experiences. Especially useful when you bicycle along the Norwegian coast (I will find time to contribute the map with my own experience since one of the byroads was a bit dangeours):

Norwegian tunnel map

 

To be continued… 😉

Advertisements

One thought on “Norway Bike Hike (Part 1): Geiranger and Norddal

What's on your heart sweetie?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s